Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 6:11-21 Flee and Pursue

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional);

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study unless noted otherwise.

1) Please read 1 Timothy 6:11-21 If you would like to mark the key words and phrases in your Bible here is a list: teach, faith, doctrine, godliness, money/riches, all references to the devil, all references to prayer.

2) What does Paul tell us to flee and what 6 things are we to pursue? The list given in these verses goes right along with the fruit of the Spirit list Paul gives us in Galatians. And Paul commands us to fight the good fight and lay hold of eternal life. These actions are to be continuous. We are to keep on keeping on. “It means to be ever fleeing [sin], to never let them catch you, to realize that the margin of safety can never be too great.” Flee sin!! Pursue godliness! Continue reading

Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 6:1-10 Work Ethic and Belief System

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional); The Bible Knowledge Commentary by Zuck; Slave by John MacArthur

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study unless noted otherwise.

1) Please read 1 Timothy 6:1-10 If you would like to mark the key words and phrases in your Bible here is a list: teach, faith, doctrine, godliness, money/riches, all references to the devil, all references to prayer.

2) We need to better understand what it meant to be a slave during the Greco-Roman era. “Slavery was a pervasive social structure…it was so commonplace that its existence as an institution was never seriously questioned by anyone…Roughly one-fifth [12 million] of the empire’s population were slaves…Most slaves had never known freedom…To be a slave was to be in someone else’s possession, totally subjugated to one’s master in everything…Each slave owner defined the nature of his slaves’ lives. For their part, slaves had only one primary objective: to please the master in everything through their loyal obedience to him.” ~ John MacArthur Continue reading

Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 5:11-25 Living Above Reproach

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional); The Bible Knowledge Commentary by Zuck

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study unless noted otherwise.

1) Please read 1 Timothy 5:11-25 . If you would like to mark the key words and phrases in your Bible here is a list: teach, faith, doctrine, godliness, money/riches, all references to the devil, all references to prayer.

2) What advice does Paul give Timothy about younger widows? Timothy must have been having trouble with this group of women. Paul even states that some had “turned aside to follow Satan.” Remember back to the earlier verses in chapter 5 where Paul speaks about “widows in need” and the requirements for those who are to be served by the church. The older widows were to take an oath to serve Christ in the church all the rest of their days. This makes me think of nuns who dedicate their lives to service. But these young widows still had sensual desires and they were young enough to still have a family. Continue reading

Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 5:1-10 Caring for Others

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional); A Woman After God’s Own Heart by Elizabeth George

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study unless noted otherwise.

1) Please read 1 Timothy 5:1-10. If you would like to mark the key words and phrases in your Bible here is a list: teach, faith, doctrine, godliness, money/riches, all references to the devil, all references to prayer.

2) Paul divides the church into 4 groups. What are they and what advice does he give Timothy about each group? We need to respect and exhort the people in the church just as we would our own family members. Continue reading

May I Encourage You? – Active Comfort

A Silhouette of Sadness

Throughout the scriptures whenever a word is used three times, it usually means, “Stop, Reader, and pay attention!” But I have found a passage where a word is used not three times, or six times, but TEN times throughout five verses of scripture. This causes me to screech to a halt and pay attention to what God is trying to tell me.

Please read and look for the word comfort. Continue reading

Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 3:14-4:16 Exercising Godliness

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional); The Practice of Godliness by Jerry Bridges; The Bible Knowledge Commentary by Zuck

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study unless noted otherwise.

1) Please read 1 Timothy 3:14-4:16. If you would like to mark the key words and phrases in your Bible here is a list: teach, faith, doctrine, godliness, money/riches, all references to the devil, all references to prayer.

2) List the six realities of the life of Christ. “The Mystery of Godliness” means that the possibility of living a godly life was, at one time, hidden, but is now revealed through Jesus. Our loyalty to Christ makes the godly life possible. These six realities show us a glimpse of God’s plan for evangelism, salvation, and discipleship. We GET to live a life that glorifies Jesus. We GET to sacrifice things of this world for rewards up in heaven. We GET to serve a kind Master instead of being enslaved by the world or flesh. Continue reading

Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 3:1-13 Requirements for Church Leaders

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional)

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study unless noted otherwise.

1) Please read 1 Timothy 3:1-13. If you would like to mark the key words and phrases in your Bible here is a list: teach, faith, doctrine, godliness, money/riches, all references to the devil, all references to prayer.

2) Godliness is a goal and desire for every person after God’s own heart to pursue. Continue reading

Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 1:18-2:15 Men, Pray. Women, Be in Quietness

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional); [I also used The Bible Knowledge Commentary by Roy Zuck]

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study unless noted otherwise.

1) Please read 1 Timothy 1:18-2:15. If you would like to mark the key words and phrases in your Bible here is a list: teach, faith, doctrine, godliness, money/riches, all references to the devil, all references to prayer.

2) Paul writes Personal Advice and Pastoral Advice at the end of chapter 1.
What duty was Timothy to fulfill? And what two spiritual necessities must Timothy hold on to?
Read 1 Timothy 1:5 and 3:9. Having faith and a good conscience go together. When one is strong so is the other. Failure in one is correlated with failure in the other. (Zuck)
Who were the two false teachers? Also see 2 Timothy 2:16-18.
What action had Paul taken?
It seems that Paul had done an “excommunication” of sorts with the motive being remediation. Hopefully these men would see the error of their ways and return to the fellowship. Continue reading

Pursuing Godliness – 1 Timothy 1:1-17

Materials: Bible, scrap paper or spiral notebook, colored pencils (optional)

All of the Pursuing Godliness quotes from Elizabeth George come from this study.

Background: 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus are called the Pastoral Epistles. Paul wrote them toward the end of his ministry. These letters were not written to entire church congregations, although they would be read to the congregations. Instead they were addressed to specific pastors and were, therefore, more personal and practical. Paul’s first imprisonment took place from AD 61-62. He then had a period of freedom from around AD 62-67. It was during this time period Paul wrote 1 Timothy and Titus. 2 Timothy was written during Paul’s second imprisonment during AD 67 before his execution. Continue reading

THREE Trials ~ Acts 24-26

Objectives:

Poster for Acts 13-28

  • to locate Caesarea on a map
  • to recognize the names of Governor Felix, Governor Festus, King Agrippa, Caesar Nero
  • to recognize the importance of a single testimony and belief in the resurrection
  • to verbalize that God has a plan and He is in control

Geography:

Paul is in custody in Caesarea.

Background:

It is important to remember of what the Jewish Leaders originally accused Paul. They had accused him of teaching all men to be against the Jews. They had also accused him of defiling the temple by bringing a Gentile into an area where he wasn’t supposed to be. Of course, both accusations are incorrect.

Knowing some history is important as well. There are 3 Roman Governors mentioned in the New Testament. Pontius Pilate, Felix and Festus. Being leaders of the Holy Land would mean that Felix and Festus were familiar with Jewish customs and beliefs. They would also have been knowledgeable of how volatile the region was. They would be motivated to keep the Jews happy so no fighting would break out. King Agrippa was the great-grandson of King Herod who had the babies of Bethlehem slaughtered. Agrippa was a practicing Jew and was very familiar with the scriptures. At this time in the early years of his reign, Caesar Nero was known as a relatively good leader of Rome.

Main Events of the Story:

Trial 1: Governor Felix received Paul and the letter from the Commander. After 5 days, the High Priest and other Jewish leaders, along with their lawyer, came to Caesarea. Paul was accused of being a “pest” or a “plague.” He was accused of creating strife among all Jews all over the world. Paul was also accused of profaning the temple. The lawyer told Felix that the Jewish Leaders had arrested Paul at the temple, but that the Commander, “with great violence” took Paul from them. Paul defended himself by telling Felix he had gone to the temple to worship, but that he does believe as those of The Way. Paul also stated that it was a handful of Jews from Asia who started all the trouble and accusations. Paul ended his defense by telling Felix that even these Jewish Leaders present had no proof of Paul doing anything except saying his statement about hope in the resurrection.

Felix stopped the trial. He was aware of those in The Way and wanted to wait for the Commander to come to the city and we don’t know if he ever did. Felix kept Paul in custody, but gave him the freedom to see, and be provided by, friends. After a few days, Felix and his wife Drusilla send for Paul to hear about his belief in Christ. As Felix came under the convection of the holy Spirit, he became afraid and sent Paul away. Felix wanted Paul to bribe him for his freedom, but Paul did not do it. Felix must have enjoyed his conversations with Paul, for he had many with him. After 2 years, Felix is replaced by Festus.

Trial 2: The High Priest told Festus about Paul and how he wanted Paul to come back to Jerusalem. (Of course he didn’t tell Festus he wanted Paul ambushed and killed on the way!) After 10 days, Festus had a trial for Paul. The High Priest and leaders complained about Paul, but they did not have enough proof to bring charges against him. Festus asked Paul, “Are you willing to stand trial in Jerusalem?” Paul responded, “To the Jews I have done no wrong. I appeal to Caesar.” In response Festus said, “You appeal to Caesar? To Caesar you shall go!”

Herod Agrippa II was the seventh and last king...

Herod Agrippa II was the seventh and last king of the family of Herod the Great, thus last of the Herodians. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Trial 3: Festus had a problem though. Paul wasn’t accused of anything! AND he was a Roman citizen so he doesn’t know what to tell Caesar about Paul. King Agrippa and his sister Bernice came to visit. Festus told Agrippa about Paul and this problem. Agrippa said, “I’d like to hear the man myself.” Paul was brought before them in chains and the leaders were in full pomp and circumstance with many other important people. Agrippa said, “Speak for yourself,” and Paul started telling his testimony including his conversion, preaching to the Gentile,s and about Jesus being risen from the dead.

At this point Festus said, “You are mad!”

Paul: I am speaking truth and reason. King Agrippa? Do you believe the prophets? (This is a very important question because Agrippa is a Jew. A good Jew believes the prophets, BUT at this point after the message Paul gave, if Agrippa stated he believed the prophets, then he would be stating that Jesus was the One who fulfilled them.)

Agrippa: Ah, Paul, you’ve almost persuaded me to be a Christian!

Paul: I hope that you, and all who hear, would become as I.

Paul was taken away and Agrippa turned to Festus and said, “This man has done nothing. He’d be free if he hadn’t appealed to Caesar.”

Life Application:

No one knows who, if anyone, came to know Jesus that day. But Paul’s testimony was important. He was preaching Truth to Kings and Governors just as Jesus said he would. He was also on his way to Rome to see Caesar just as Jesus said. God’s promises are true and trustworthy.

The fact of Jesus’ resurrection is still a stumbling block to many people. People have a hard time fathoming anyone coming back to life. Christianity is THE only religion who’s “prophet” or “messiah” is alive. That’s why our celebration of Easter is so important. Perhaps it should be a greater holiday than Christmas. Because without Easter, Christmas means nothing.

Wanna know what happened before this? Go read Trials Begin: Acts 23